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May 7, 2009

Dambisa Moyo


Dambisa Moyo is an economist and the author of Dead Aid: Why Aid is Not Working and How There is a Better Way For Africa, published in the spring of 2009. The book offers proposals for developing countries to finance development, instead of relying on foreign aid. It became a New York Times bestseller upon its release in the United States and remains a bestseller amongst Political and Economic books. Her book is published internationally by Penguin Books and in the United States by Farrar, Straus & Giroux.


In April 2009, TIME Magazine named Moyo one of the world's 100 most influential people.


Moyo was born and raised in Lusaka, Zambia. She holds a Doctorate in Economics from Oxford University and a Masters from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. She also has an MBA in Finance and Bachelors degree in Chemistry from American University in Washington D.C. She worked for the World Bank for 2 years as a Consultant (from 1993-1995) and at Goldman Sachs for 8 years (from 2001 to 2008), where she worked in the debt capital markets and as an economist in the global macroeconomics team.
Moyo’s second book entitled How the West Was Lost is scheduled for publication with Penguin and Farrar, Straus & Giroux in Spring 2010. The book evaluates the policy decisions in the US and other Western economies that contributed to the 2008 financial crisis and examines the policies of the newest economic powers—China, Russia and the Middle East—who may now be in pole positions to become the dominant economic players of the 21st century. Read more here/source

2 comments:

Ebony Intuition said...

From the Publisher
In the past fifty years, more than $1 trillion in development-related aid has been transferred from rich countries to Africa. Has this assistance improved the lives of Africans? No. In fact, across the continent, the recipients of this aid are not better off as a result of it, but worse--much worse. In "Dead Aid," Dambisa Moyo describes the state of postwar development policy in Africa today and unflinchingly confronts one of the greatest myths of our time: that billions of dollars in aid …+ read more
In the past fifty years, more than $1 trillion in development-related aid has been transferred from rich countries to Africa. Has this assistance improved the lives of Africans? No. In fact, across the continent, the recipients of this aid are not better off as a result of it, but worse--much worse.
In "Dead Aid," Dambisa Moyo describes the state of postwar development policy in Africa today and unflinchingly confronts one of the greatest myths of our time: that billions of dollars in aid sent from wealthy countries to developing African nations has helped to reduce poverty and increase growth. In fact, poverty levels continue to escalate and growth rates have steadily declined--and millions continue to suffer. Provocatively drawing a sharp contrast between African countries that have rejected the aid route and prospered and others that have become aid-dependent and seen poverty increase, Moyo illuminates the way in which overreliance on aid has trapped developing nations in a vicious circle of aid dependency, corruption, market distortion, and further poverty, leaving them with nothing but the "need" for more aid. Debunking the current model of international aid promoted by both Hollywood celebrities and policy makers, Moyo offers a bold new road map for financing development of the world's poorest countries that guarantees economic growth and a significant decline in poverty--without reliance on foreign aid or aid-related assistance.
"Dead Aid" is an unsettling yet optimistic work, a powerful challenge to the assumptions and arguments that support a profoundly misguided development policy in Africa. And it is a clarion call to a new, more hopeful vision of how to address the desperate poverty that plagues millions.

http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/books/Dead-Aid-Dambisa-Moyo/9780374139568-item.html?ref=Search+Books%3a+%2527dead+aid%2527

Cee said...

Great lady with even greater ideas, for more on her work you could follow her facebook group. I think the world is starting to take her seriously, maybe it's time Africa will arise from Aid.

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